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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable. every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being done. john king, ken rogath is the former chief economist at the international monetary fund and diane swonk joins us from mezro financial. john, some people say don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done in an 11th hour deal. as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> both sides digging in. you played the president saying, i want that rate hike. the republicans say we'll give you the revenues but not through a rate hike. the president believes he won the election and he upped the ante saying he wants twice as much in tax revenues than he wanted a year and a half ago. the president believes he has higher ground under this. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. they have public opinion on their side. if you talk to people in washington there is a sense that at the last minute reason will prevail. there is a not a lot of optimism. you know this and my colleagues k
cliff and what it's doing for hiring, or the lack of it. and speaking of the fiscal cliff, let me say to washington, no vacation without legislation. we will be virtually monitoring airports to see which legislators are leaving town now that the vacation is supposed to begin. you know what? if we don't have a deal by this vacation, or a pledge not to go away, then the odds go to -- down to 50-50 that we'll get one before the end of the year. and then we may only get one when people look at their take-home play and have a collective bout of nausea from a recognition that there was a fiscal cliff all along and we were just pushed over it. that's how much your paycheck's going to shrink. here's the bottom line. let's hope for the best that our politicians move in the right direction. something we can see as early as sunday morning when they appear on the major political talk shows like "meet the press." but we'll be preparing for the worst. >> the house of pain! >> that our lawmakers go home for the holidays, meaning we will likely go over the cliff and nothing will be done about it unti
getting freaked out by fiscal cliff situation in washington and basically would not necessarily be firing people basically putting everything on hold. they would simply not be making hiring decisions. there is other data saying that is what businesses are doing, and yet we saw a number saying all the new jobs. that indicates there is more momentum summer in the economy. host: retail is at the head of the list with 53,000 jobs. is that because of christmas? guest: they tried to take seasonal jobs out of it. that is not necessarily because of the holiday season. it does show consumers are shopping. that is one of the things you expect to come back early in a recession. those are not all full-time jobs, and they are not high- paying jobs. a lot of my be part-time jobs. it is better than having no jobs coming back. we are seeing those jobs coming back. we are seeing business service jobs, some might be temporary jobs. almost would be my call miscellaneous office workers. we are seeing some jobs coming back in the hospitality industry. hotels, restaurants. that tells you people are traveling a
. >>> and now, we want to take you to washington to update you on the fiscal cliff tonight. 25 days from now, and today, something new. president obama and speaker of the house, john boehner, decided to take charge together. they dismissed other members of their parties, saying they will hammer it out together, try to move the deal forward. >>> and also today, encouraging new jobs report. employers added 146,000 jobs last month, defying the predictions and the disruption of hurricane sandy. the unemployment rate fell to 7.7%, that's the lowest level in four years. but tonight, 12 million americans are still unemployed. and the new jobs number, the fiscal cliff, all of it will be on the table when george stephanopoulos sits down with a turbocharged powerhouse round table. james carville, mary matalin and nobel prize-winning economist paul krugman, on sunday for "this week." >>> and now, we go overseas to syria, where people are fleeing amid fears that the assad regime will unleash chemical weapons. the region around the capital, damascus, now a battle zone. 2 million syrians now on the run, m
. >> to washington, d.c. now and the fiscal cliff negotiation. the back and forth between both sides hasn't been complimentary. quite the opposite, in fact, which means the country needs to prepare for what comes next. that would be automatic spending cups and the expiration of bush era tax breaks. the pentagon has been preparing, and as our john callan reports, so have families who have a whole lot to lose if a deal doesn't get done. >> reporter: jeremy connor, married father of two. >> i've worked recently for a very large defense contractor, and my wife works for that same defense contractor. >> reporter: he left that job after 18 years for more stability since the couple both worked in the same department. >> the discussion of the fiscal cliff just made sense for one of us to get out. >> you know, we didn't know what it looked like down the road, if we were even going to have jobs at all. >> reporter: pentagon's budget for the next ten years has already been flashed $500 billion, and could face another half trillion in automatic cuts if congress fails to compromise on a deficit-reducing agre
. >>> meanwhile, back in washington, with just over three weeks left to make a deal on the fiscal cliff, both sides out with new statents today. and on the surface, they still sound far apart. president obama this morning saying he's going to insist on raising taxes on the wealthiest americans no matter what. >> if we're serious about reducing our deficit while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle-class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> meanwhile, on the other side of the aisle, republican senator marco rubio gave the weekly republican address today. part of his message? the tax rate should not go up on anyone including the top 2%. >> we must reform our complicated, uncertain, job-killing tax code by getting rid of unjustified loopholes. but our goal should be to generate new revenue by creating new taxpayers, not new taxes. >> joining me, author of "the escape artists: how obama's
couples. that follows the legalization of marijuana in colorado and washington and a fiscal cliff battle up to the majority of americans calling for higher taxes on the rich. joining me now for strategy talk, karen finney, msnbc political analyst and former dnc communications director and chip saltsman, republican strategist and former manager of mike huckabee's presidential campaign. welcome. you look resplend end in purple, karen. are we experiencing a liberalization of america? if so what is the catalyst? >> if you take a look at both the issue landscape and the exit polling from the most recent election, i think it gives you kind of a road map as to what's going on here. i mean, we are a more diverse country. we have more diverse backgrounds and interests. we did see sort of the issue landscape with regard to the exit polling showing that people's opinions are changing on a lot of these issues. look at the millennial generation. they are far more tolerant generation, far more diverse generation. i think what this reflects is those same kind of demographic shifts that we saw manifest
a discussion on the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations and the impact on unemployment insurance. from "washington journal" this is 40 minutes. host: we continue our look at unemployment insurance and its role in the fiscal clift debate, we are joined by michael tanner and josh bivens. mr. michael tanner, if you had your way in these discussions, where what unemployment insurance end up at the end of the day? guest: i think the emergency extension should fade away and we should go back to the 46 weeks that we have been at, the 26 weeks of traditional employment, and extended benefits in states that have higher unemployment rates. you start with the fact that unemployment insurance itself, when you extended for a long times as questionable value. we know it leads to an increase in the on and -- unemployment rate. that is dubious enough, but when you factor in that we will deficit finance this and slow economic growth overall, destroying jobs of the same time we pay people for being unemployed, a thing that creates a problem. host: how much money do we save if we do not extend emergency
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)